In The Works 2019 – Jan 6. 9.45 PM – 5 PM
La Mama – Great Jones Space (47 Great Jones).

Since 2013, In The Works has served as a forum by and for independent artists and arts workers to share work with presenters, funders and other colleagues during January conferences and festivals in a relaxed and artist-centered setting. This Jan 6, we are proud to host works by: Anna Sperber , BamBam Frost* , DELIRIOUS Dances / Edisa Weeks, Fana Fraser, Laurie Berg, mayfield brooks and Samlingen – Amanda Apetrea, Nadja Hjorton, Halla Ólafsdóttir, Stina Nyberg and Zoë Poluch.* Additionally, Mallory Catlett/Restless NYC installation ‘Archive:This Was The End’ will be presented by CultureHub (third floor) from 11am-5pm details and The New York Dance and Performance Awards (AKA the Bessies) will host a Presenter Award and Reception (galleria) from 5-7pm.

In The Works was founded by Meredith Boggia and, in 2019, is produced with Magnus Nordberg/Nordberg Movement (Sweden) and guests Lindsey Dietz Marchant and Marýa Wethers – and is co-presented with La MaMa

Details and RSVP instructions at www.meredithboggia.com

Info on Mallory Catlett/Restless NYC “Archive: This Was The End” https://www.culturehub.org/events/2019/1/5/this-was-the-end

Info on The Bessies Presenter Award and Reception:
https://bessies.org/2019-bessies-presenter-award-and-gathe…/

* participation made possible with support by the Swedish Arts Council and the Swedish Arts Grant Committee

Studio Showings:

9:45 – 10: 15 mayfield brooks Letters to Marsha
10:15-10:55 BamBam Frost* Like a prayer – a prelude
10:55-11:35 Samlingen* herstory and current practices
11:35- 12:05 Anna Sperber Wealth From the Salt Seas
12:05-12:35 Edisa Weeks THREE RITES: Liberty
12:35-1:05 Fana Fraser BBB
1:05-1:35 Laurie Berg Brandscape
1:40-2:10 Anna Sperber Wealth From the Salt Seas
2:10-2:50 Samlingen* herstory and current practices
2:50- 3:30 BamBam Frost* Like a prayer – a prelude
3:30-4:00 Fana Fraser BBB
4:00-4:30 Laurie Berg Brandscape
4:30-5:00 Edisa Weeks THREE RITES: Liberty

Events:

11am-5pm Mallory Catlett ARCHIVE: This Was The End (installation)

5pm-7pm The Bessie Awards Presenter Reception (reception)

mayfield brooks

Letters to Marsha (excerpt)

9:45 am

Letters to Marsha, a performance project conceived and performed by mayfield brooks, is based on danced and written love notes to queer ancestor Marsha ‘Pay It No Mind’ Johnson with whom mayfield had a “missed connection” in 1992 when mayfield was 21 and Marsha 46. This project explores the weight of history, of Marsha’s drowned body found floating in the Hudson River, and mayfield’s own evolution as a Black, non-binary queer. These narratives connect contemporary specters of Black queer death to histories of enslavement through movement, voice, video projection, sound, humor and pathos, creating a temporal back and forth through time and place, a meditation on love, and an array of colors and tones that call back the dead to remind us how to live.

mayfield brooks improvises while black, and is currently based in brooklyn, new york. mayfield is a movement-based performance artist, urban farmer, writer, and wanderer. they studied contemporary dance at the school for new dance (sndo) in amsterdam, moving on center in oakland, ca, and holds a mfa in interdisciplinary performance from uc davis and a masters in performance studies from northwestern university. mayfield is currently a 2017 artist in residence at movement research nyc, was a 2018 wow/uny artist in residence at governor’s island, and has taught contemporary & improvisational dance nationally and internationally.

BamBam Frost

Like a prayer – A prelude

By BamBam Frost

10:15 am & 2:10pm

In “Like a prayer -a prelude” we float between the illegible and the explicit in an ongoing study of the quiet, pleasures and in-betweens within black pop-culture. This is the beginning of a work that will premiere later in 2019 and during this evening is performed and explored together with dancer Lydia Östberg Diakité.

BamBam Frost is a Swedish/American dancer and choreographer. She graduated from Stockholm University of the Arts, with a bachelor of contemporary dance spring 2013. SORRY, with witch she had her choreographic debut, premiered in 2018 and was the start of an artistic research circling around black entertainment culture within the western context. Besides her own work, BamBam is touring and performing with To Come- extended by Mette Ingvartsen. She has been a part of dance collective P*fect since 2008 and has also participated in works by by Alexandra Pirici, Erik Linghede, Marina Abramovic, Paloma Madrid, Mari Carrasco and Lisa Janbell.

Samlingen

Amanda Apetrea, Nadja Hjorton, Halla Ólafsdóttir, Stina Nyberg and Zoë Poluch*

a brief overview of their herstory and current practices

10:55 am & 3:30 pm

Samlingen will in their presentation give a brief overview of their herstory, current practices, how and why they work together. Focusing on the expanded, ungraspable landscapes that this feminist collective is a part of and that to a large extent shapes how and why they do what they do.

Samlingen means the collection or the assembly, and is a choreographic project that facilitates a common interest in choreography and feminism as it is intertwined with dance history. Samlingen is Amanda Apetrea, Halla Ólafsdóttir, Nadja Hjorton, Stina Nyberg and Zoë Poluch. Individual artists bios:

Amanda Apetrea(born in 1981 in Uppsala, Sweden) is a performer and choreographer based in Stockholm. In her work she integrates political theories such as feminism, sexpositivism, body positivism, transfeminism and queerutopism. Apetrea went to Ballet Academy in Stockholm and has a master in choreography from DOCH (University College of Dance and Circus), Stockholm. Her works are marked by her a significantly feminist point of view that calls into question larger power structures of modern world through the performance of classical and cultural dance, spectacle and conceptual performance. Her current works challenge structures that restrain and inhibit the microcosm of the choreographic field as a reflection of society at large. Amanda co-founded the ÖFA-collective (2004), a feminist art collective and a support and discussion group, along with 23 other members. As Amanda has continued to critically examine, integrate and inhabit the overlapping politically radical theoretical concepts (feminism, sex positivity, body positivity, queer utopianism, to name a few) her work has significantly hinged on the collaborative process, and ethos fostered with the ÖFA-collective. Some of these collaboratively authored works are: I Ass Jazz with Emma Tolander and Lisen Rosell, Beauty and the Beast (2011) and DEAD (2017) with Halla Ólafsdóttir featuring Lisen Rosell and Chrisander Brun (jardin d’europe 2013 prize winner), Samlingen with Nadja Hjorton, Zoë Poluch, Stina Nyberg and Halla Ólafsdóttir, I’m a Very Understanding Woman with Mica Sigourney (SF, USA), The Clan of the Cave Bear with Nadja Hjorton and Lisen Rosell. Amanda is currently working with Mica Sigourney with their new creation SPRINGTIME that will open in Sweden, Febuary 2019.

Halla Ólafsdóttir is an Icelandic dancer and choreographer with an MA in choreography from DOCH in Stockholm. She works collectively in various constellations that look for ways of expanding the notion of choreography on and off stage. Her work often revolves around inventing new formats for dance performances and how politics and gender are projected onto body movements. She has recently been touring the piece Giselle, together with John Moström, which involves the partake of over a hundred artists in Europe. As well as the dance piece Beauty and the Beast, together with Amanda Apetrea, which won the Prix Jardin d’Europe Awards at ImpulsTanz in 2013. Her work takes on various forms and expressions, she co-curated the Reykjavík Dance Festival: A Series of Event 2012 where 30 artist were invited to partake in a 10 day festival in Iceland and recently played the lead role in the feature film Under Influence by Sidney Leoni. She has worked collectively with Samlingen with Zoe Poluch, Stina Nyberg, Nadja Hjorton and Amanda Apetrea. Halla was part of a collective project with the band the Knife, co-creating and performing, along with eleven other artists, the show Shaking the Habitual, touring it in Europe and North-America, in 2013-2014. She recently premiered and toured with the pieces BITCHCRAFT, DEAD and Romeo and Juliet

Stina Nyberg (born in 1981 in Örnsköldsvik, Sweden) has been making and performing choreography in Sweden for many years, but is currently based in New York. In her practice, she uses conviction and illusion in order to create new systems of logic which constructs the world differently, and make bodies act accordingly. At moments she calls this performative force magic, sometimes a craft, and occasionally a practice. Her departure point is always a feminist approach to the body; its social and political construction and ability to move. Stina graduated from her MA in choreography at DOCH in Stockholm in 2012. Stina has developed a series of independent works in collaboration with choreographers, musicians, visual artists, technicians and magicians. Her latest project, The Tesla Project, involves a solo performance with a Tesla coil (Thunderstruck, 2017), a lecture performance (The woman who lit the world, 2018) and a live concert with drone musician Maria W Horn (Alternating Currents, 2018), as well as a puppet show about ghost sex in collaboration with Diederik Peeters and Andros Zins-Browne (Spectrophilia, 2018). Stina is the choreographer of the live concert Shaking the Habitual by the Swedish band The Knife and was performing in the show 2013-2014, and in 2014 she developed a new work for the Cullberg Ballet (Tones & Bones, 2014). In 2012 Stina received a residency grant at Movement Research and has since then kept returning to NYC. In addition to the collective Samlingen she is also part of the collective The Bureau for the Future of Choreography, with whom she participated in several projects in collaboration with the New Museum (2012), LMCC (2014) and American Realness (2017).

Zoë Poluch has the unique capacity to make the most simple questions into complex investigations, and thus the format of a bio into an impossible endeavour. Her practice spans from instigating practice based collaborations to dancing poems about dance, in a detour across stage performances, sound choreographies and movements of the social life. Her deeply critical eye for the contemporary dance scene is based on a long term and practice-based interest in the moving body. As she teaches, dances, talks, writes and thinks, she does it with a precise gymnastics of the senses. Zoë completed her masters degree in choreography at DOCH, Stockholm in 2010. Since then she has not developed one distinct choreographic interest or signature, but instead experiments with the different shapes of writing, dancing, organizing symposia, performing, collaborating, choreographing, reading and talking. Making performances has surfaced as the best excuse to bring together and forth a group that can actively approach and challenge “how to work”, questioning both the conditions to make work and how work encounters an audience. Lately, this work is attracted to developing and challenging various modes of co-existence, recently in the shape of a site-specific project located in a 9-story building in a Stockholm suburb. One activity that resiliently attracts her, at times mysteriously, is dancing. She looks forward to the far future, perhaps 2070, when she will inaugurate a dance company for powerful people over 70 years old and tour all the big stages of the world. In the past, she studied, trained and worked in Canada and Belgium and could be found dancing and acting on big and small stages, kind of all over. Recently, this has included her own work, a solo called “Example”, a collaborative performance “Aphelion Slip” with Kim Coleman and Cara Tolmie, performing with The Knife’s “Shaking the Habitual” concert/show, “On Air” with Nadja Hjorton, dancing in “Splendour” by Stina Nyberg. Her latest collaboration is a piece titled “Radio III” made together with Hanako Hoshimi-Caines and Elisa Harkins that will premiere in June, 2019.

Nadja Hjorton is a Swedish choreographer and dancer based in Stockholm. She did the MA program in Choreography at DOCH from 2010-2012. Nadja is interested in thinking choreography through different contexts and formats and she is working with dance and choreography, seeking to challenge norms and notions of what choreography and dance is and can be. Her works deal with issues like power, body politics, sexuality, humor and desire and she is always busy with finding different ways and spaces for people to spend time together –  the theatre room being one space full of potential for this activity. Nadja had made a numerous of independent and collaborative works over the years. Her latest works, MILF, Cuteness overload (with Lisen Rosell and Anna Efraimsson) and Clan of the cave bear with (with Lisen Rosell and Amanda Apetrea), are moving around thematics like motherhood, cute aggression, object/subject, gaze and sexual desire. In her two pieces Radio dance and On air radio broadcasting became the format for the choreography and in Medea- it’s a classic she used the classical play as a starting point for her work.  Nadja’s works have been presented at several venues and festivals around Europe.

Nadja is part of the feminist collective ÖFA-kollektivet that has been a recurring point in the culture scene for more than 10 years.

Anna Sperber

Wealth From the Salt Seas (excerpt)

11:35 am & 1:40pm

Wealth From The Salt Seas explores the embodiment of assertion and agency through visceral somatic experience. Vocalist and composer Gelsey Bell joins Anna Sperber in performance to collaboratively mine the physical space of the theater for its poetic and emotional vibrations. The female body emerges as a resonant, echoing force within a visual landscape conceived in collaboration with scenographer Sara C. Walsh and lighting designer Elliott Cennetoglu.

Anna Sperber is a Brooklyn-based choreographer and performer. Her work has been described by The New York Times as “immediately compelling” and “wonderfully strange” with “moments of theatrical magic.” Her performances are rooted in the poetic potency of choreography and its potential for perceptual transformation, embodying a tension between formality and chaotic wildness.

DELIRIOUS Dances / Edisa Weeks

THREE RITES: Liberty,

12:05pm & 4:30pm

DELIRIOUS Dances / Edisa Weeks is showing an excerpt from THREE RITES: Liberty, which explores how liberty is protected, promoted, and manifests in the body. Connected like a puppet to objects that have informed the Black experience in America (bible, black dildo, blonde wig, light bulb, gun, watermelon), Edisa Weeks alternates between white face, black face, visceral ritual dance and storytelling to examine how the ideals of liberty are upheld in America. THREE RITES received a 2018 Creation & Development Fund Award from National Performance Network/Visual Artists Network, co-commissioned by 651 ARTS in partnership with Restoration ART and Mount Tremper Arts. The full work will premiere in Brooklyn, NY in June 2020.

Founded by multi-disciplinary artist Edisa Weeks, DELIRIOUS Dances seeks to erase the barriers between art and life, between performance space and audience space, and between mediums. We are interested in finding ways for the audience to interact with and influence the experience of a work. We believe that art revitalizes the everyday to reveal something new about ourselves, and the revelation is an energy, a spark that has the power to change the world. www.deliriousdances.com

Fana Fraser

BBB (excerpt)

12:35 pm & 3:30PM

This year I’ve been reading and rereading a dear friend’s poem’s, Shivanee Ramlochan’s Everyone Knows I Am a Haunting. Shivanee’s poems have been resonating deeply with me and are eerily connected to the world of BBB, a world that has been unscrambling itself since a pair of orange gloves found me in March 2017. BBB is shaping up to be many things: a bloody bloody bay, a brave bitter birth, a beautiful bellowing beast. I am working in collaboration with musician and dramaturge Lydia Moore, blending underbelly tempos of the Caribbean with rhythm & blues, and conjuring a fantastic world of desire with remnants of a brutal colonial history. With stillness and mania, BBB is morphing into a new word for revenge. BBB might be my new formula for power.”

Born and raised in Trinidad & Tobago, Fana Fraser is a performer and performance maker living in New York City. Her performance work is rooted in a contemporary Caribbean aesthetic and framed by narratives of women’s erotic agency, desire, and sexuality in the Caribbean. Harnessing dance, theatre, and visual art, Fana creates performances that center hidden tales of people from global communities of color, rigorously imagining them with fantasy and compassion. She uses performance to gather community, foster multilayered storytelling, and facilitate cross-cultural dialogue. Fana is devoted to conjuring a space for performer and witness to negotiate ways of being.

Laurie Berg

Brandscapes

1:05pm & 4:00pm

Laurei Berg will present a lecture demonstation related to her lastes premiere Sacpes, presented this fall by Danspace Project and Times Square Arts and featured in Dance Magazine’s November issue. Whether she is working with dance and performance, collage, or jewelry, Laurie Berg draws on her interest in iconography, detail, humor, and absurdity to cultivate a collaborative, creative space that allows for rigorous play. Through complex choreographic structures and collaborations between people and objects, her performances conjure a space that is simultaneously structured and fantastical, layering together past, present, and future; bodies, objects, light, and space; imagination and knowledge; the real and the surreal

Laurie Berg (b. 1980, works and lives in New York City) is a dancer, performer, collagist, and jewelry maker. Her projects have appeared at The Kitchen, WeisAcres, BAX, Danspace Project at St. Mark’s Church, Dixon Place, Beach Sessions Dance Series, Astor Alive! Festival, The Invisible Dog Art Center as part of The Joyce Theater’s Unleashed Series, The Whitney Museum, The Mattatuck Museum of Art (CT), Catch, Avant-Garde-Arama, WiM at the TBG Theater, Pieter PASD (CA), Roulette Intermedium, Movement Research at the Judson Church, Food for Thought, Danspace Project’s Food for Thought and DraftWork series, and at Danspace Project as part of PLATFORM 2011: Body Madness – Rhythm and Humor, FACADE/FASAD, 303 Gallery, ICMC at Stony Brook University, the TANK, draftwork, and AUNTS among others. Berg was a 2016–17 LMCC Workspace Artist-In-Residence, the 2016 recipient of the Tom Murrin Performance Award, was a 2013 New York Live Arts Studio Series Artist and a 2010 Movement Research Artist-In-Residence. She co-curated the 2017 Movement Research Spring Festival and is currently a member of the Movement Research Artist Advisory Council. She also co-produces AUNTS, an underground platform for dance and performance, with Liliana Dirks-Goodman.

Mallory Catlett / Restless NYC

Archive This Was The End

An installation presented by CultureHub

1/5/19 12pm–6pm
1/6/19 11am–5pm
1/7/19 10am–2pm

Archive: This Was The End is at once an artifact and experience — the afterlife of a performance as interactive sculpture. Here, you are the actor, and a wall — salvaged from the old PS 122 community center — is the physical manifestation of a memory of a play, which your presence activates and disrupts. Sound and video portraits embedded and mapped onto the wall produce a reverse relief. What is far seems near and near, far. The past hypnotizes the present, denying its erasure, to remind us of a life before that continues. Directed and created by Mallory Catlett/Restless NYC, Archive: This Was The End features video and programming by Keith Skretch, sound and video manipulation by G Lucas Crane and performances on video by G Lucas Crane, Black-Eyed Susan, Jim Himelsbach, Rea C Wright, and Paul Zimet. It was developed with production support and residency provided by EMPAC / Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Archive: This Was The End will be free and open to the public during gallery hours listed below. The installation will run on a continuous loop and audience is welcome to drop in at any time. RSVP is available but not required.